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Liga MX continues to be a buying force in South America

Wilson Morelo shined while at Santa Fe and will have a second chance in Liga MX.

Lucas Uebel/Getty Images

To a degree, South American football has always been dominated financially by Argentina and Brazil, but Mexico are starting to increasingly build a bigger role in bringing players and coaches to Liga MX.

Often if a player or coach shows flashes of promise in South America, he is seduced by higher wages in Europe or moves to a bigger club within the continent. But a significant amount of talent is starting to make their way to Mexico.

It's only been a week since Luis Zubeldia coached his last game for LDU Quito in the Ecuadorian Serie A final, and the 34-year old Argentine coach has already been announced as Santos Laguna's new manager. It may seem strange to say about a manager, but Zubeldia is passing on the opportunity to coach in the Copa Libertadores to take over a side that finished as one of the last-placed teams in Liga MX.

The unique virtue of South American football is that it gives a good window for youngsters on their way up. Young Colombian and Ecuadorian players have become a very good support base for several Liga MX teams. In addition, young South American managers like Matias Almeyda are looking at Mexico as an attractive option.

Last Sunday, Atletico Nacional clinched their 15th Colombian league title and they did it with several Liga MX-owned players. Yimmy Chara, who is set to go out on loan to relegation-threatened Dorados de Sinaloa, was the team's second highest scorer with five goals.

And talking about strikers that shined in their home countries, Tigres bought a good player in Fernando Fernandez from Guarani. The Liga MX champions fended off interest from several Brazilian clubs for the 23-year-old Paraguayan striker.

Much has been made of the driving forces that allow Liga MX teams to increase their spending power in South America. A relaxed policy on naturalized players has opened the door more than ever for Mexican teams to do their bidding south of the border.

Money is clearly not lacking. In 2014, a total of 123 players confirmed a move from South America to Mexico and numbers are expected to be similar for 2015.

Liga MX teams are eager to find the next Jackson Martinez or even the next Edwin Cardona. With some already established names like Uruguayan international Carlos Sanchez, along with up and comers like Brian Lozano, it may not take long for a Liga MX team to uncover more players tailor-made for Mexican success. At what cost to the Mexican player is a completely different question.